Black and Hispanic People May Be More Likely to Have a Second Hemorrhagic Stroke than Whites

Wednesday, June 06, 2018


Results from a study published online in the journal Neurology suggest that black and Hispanic people may be more likely to have a second hemorrhagic stroke compared to white people who have had a hemorrhagic stroke. Previous studies have shown that blacks and Hispanics are at greater risk of a first hemorrhagic stroke, and that all people who’ve had one hemorrhagic stroke are at higher risk of a second, which is often fatal.

Study author Alessandro Biffi, MD, of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. “Since controlling high blood pressure is the main method of preventing second strokes and we know that there are racial and ethnic differences in the prevalence of high blood pressure and its severity, we really wanted to investigate these differences.”

Combining results from 2 studies in which 2,281 people who’d had a stroke were followed, a total of 98 had a second hemorrhagic stroke. The occurrence of a second stroke was 6.1% (37) of the Hispanic people, 6.6% (26) of the black people, and 1.7% in the white people. Statistical analysis showed that blacks were more than twice as likely to have a recurrence of stroke than white people, and that recurrent stroke in Hispanic people is approximately 70% more likely than it is in white people. 

Although the average systolic blood pressure was higher for black (149 mm Hg) and Hispanic (146 mm Hg) people than for whites (141 mm Hg), when results were adjusted for the blood pressure differences, black people were still nearly twice as likely to have another stroke than white people and Hispanic people were about 50% more likely to have another stroke.

“The differences in blood pressure among these groups do not fully account for the differences in the risk of having another stroke,” Biffi said. “More research is needed to determine the factors behind this disparity.”

Results from a study published online in the journal Neurology suggest that black and Hispanic people may be more likely to have a second hemorrhagic stroke compared to white people who have had a hemorrhagic stroke. Previous studies have shown that blacks and Hispanics are at greater risk of a first hemorrhagic stroke, and that all people who’ve had one hemorrhagic stroke are at higher risk of a second, which is often fatal.

Study author Alessandro Biffi, MD, of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. “Since controlling high blood pressure is the main method of preventing second strokes and we know that there are racial and ethnic differences in the prevalence of high blood pressure and its severity, we really wanted to investigate these differences.”

Combining results from 2 studies in which 2,281 people who’d had a stroke were followed, a total of 98 had a second hemorrhagic stroke. The occurrence of a second stroke was 6.1% (37) of the Hispanic people, 6.6% (26) of the black people, and 1.7% in the white people. Statistical analysis showed that blacks were more than twice as likely to have a recurrence of stroke than white people, and that recurrent stroke in Hispanic people is approximately 70% more likely than it is in white people. 

Although the average systolic blood pressure was higher for black (149 mm Hg) and Hispanic (146 mm Hg) people than for whites (141 mm Hg), when results were adjusted for the blood pressure differences, black people were still nearly twice as likely to have another stroke than white people and Hispanic people were about 50% more likely to have another stroke.

“The differences in blood pressure among these groups do not fully account for the differences in the risk of having another stroke,” Biffi said. “More research is needed to determine the factors behind this disparity.”

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